Bruins Alumni: Happy Birthday Flash Hollett

( Photo Credit: Stanley Cup of Chowder | stanleycupofchowder.com )

By: Andrew Lindroth | Follow me on Twitter @andrewlindrothh

Flash Hollett was born on April 13th, 1911, in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. He began playing in the International Hockey League (IHL) for the Syracuse Stars (IHL) as a 21-year-old defenceman from 1932-1933. During the time, though, he was playing both lacrosse and hockey and was first noticed by the Toronto Maple Leafs Owner after watching him play lacrosse with Lionel Conacher. After that season, the Toronto Maple Leafs claimed Hollett. After just 13 games playing with their minor-pro affiliate, the Buffalo Bisons (IHL), Hollett was called up for his first National Hockey League action with Toronto.

Hollett only played five games for Toronto before being loaned to the Ottawa Senators for the remainder of the 1933-1934 season. The following season, he returned to Toronto and played 48 games, recording 10-16-26 numbers, and helped lead Toronto to a Stanley Cup Finals appearance. During the 1935-1936 season, the defenceman played only 11 games with Toronto before being traded to the Boston Bruins in exchange for $16,000. He only played five games with the Bruins that season, before being reassigned to the Boston Cubs (Can-Am) for the remainder of the season. In 1936-1937, Hollett solidified his position in the Boston Bruins lineup with his speed, puck handling ability, and gritty style, playing in all 48 games that season while producing three goals and ten points. He quickly emerged as one of the top offensive-defensemen in the NHL.

Hollett went on to play for the Bruins for the majority of his career from 1936-1944, suiting up for a total of 353 games with the Bruins and posting 84-115-199 numbers. In 1942, he broke the NHL record for goals by a defenceman in a single season with 19 goals and tied his record again the following season. He also led the Bruins to win two Stanley Cup Championships in 1939 and 1941, and brought them to the Stanley Cup Finals one more time in 1943 but was defeated by the Detroit Red Wings. Hollett played his final 25 games as a Bruin before being shipped to Detroit in exchange for Pat Egan in January of 1944.

( Photo Credit: Puck Struck | puckstruck.com )

Hollett finished the season with Detroit, appearing in 27 games and posting 6-12-18 numbers. The next season in 1944-1945, he broke the NHL record for most goals by a defenceman in a single season again, this time he scored 20 goals and his record would go on to last about 25 years before being surpassed by Bobby Orr. After his record-breaking season, his offensive numbers began to dwindle the following season quickly, contributing just 13 points in 38 games played. During the 1946 off-season, Hollett was traded to the New York Rangers in exchange for Ab DeMarco and Hank Goldup. But, the transaction was voided after Hollett decided to retire in June of 1946 officially.

Flash Hollett passed away on April 20th, 1990, at the age of 88. Throughout his 13-year career in the NHL, Hollett suited up for a total of 560 games and recorded 132-181-313 numbers. After retiring from the NHL, the two-time Stanley Cup champion moved on to play for the Kitchener Dutchmen (OHA-Sr.) and Toronto Marlboros (OHA-Sr.) from 1947-1950, playing in a total of 88 games and recording 19-53-72 numbers before officially retiring from the hockey world in 1950. Happy birthday, Flash Hollett!

Check out the new Black N’ Gold Hockey Podcast episode 174 that we recorded below on 4-12-20! You can find our show on many worldwide platforms such as Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeart Radio, Spotify, SoundCloud, and Stitcher.

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